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20130801
20130831
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CSPAN2 36
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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2013 5:00pm EDT
the presidency, said, and the house and did not like george bush very much. sure hated losing to them in 2004. they did not quit. they kept working. they took the house and the senate and the white house. it played by the rules. we took them back in 2010. never try to impeach george bush. think long and hard. these things are difficult because it is always easy to say try it. we are doing is now working. usually what that means is we need to work harder for we doing . i am old enough to watch barry goldwater go down in flames. i hated it. it took 16 years to get ronald reagan. but when we got ronald reagan it changed america and the world and ended the old soviet system. so democracy is hard work, stuff like this, people going in knocking on doors, people, you know, going out and voting. we do it. our system works. it's hard to work, and it's hard to work in part because that is what the founders wanted to be. very afraid of centralized powerful government. it will make this difficult to do. but power announcer representatives with the people, the states every year, president that for four ye
CSPAN
Aug 5, 2013 8:30pm EDT
-span: do you think people would be surprised you voted for george bush in 1980? >> guest: i suppose so because i think the most surprised person would probably be president bush. write to what what you think you'd be surprised? >> guest: well i think most presidents get sensitive about the post and "newsweek" as well and he had his issues with us but i think any president does. but i suspect he would not think i voted for him. c-span: give us a thumbnail sketch of the post today. how many newspapers and television stations? how big is said and what is the revenue on a yearly basis? >> guest: we are about ad 1.6 million in annual revenues and the company holds mainly "the washington post" and we have a small newspaper the herald and half of the international "herald tribune" and may have "newsweek" and six television stations and 1.5 million cable connections, and we also have -- which is our medium of "the washington post" web site. c-span: are you still chairman of the executive committee? -- committee. >> guest: i am. c-span: how long were you chairman of "the washington post"? >> gu
CSPAN
Aug 13, 2013 7:00am EDT
believe the economy was so messed up by george bush that obama struggled mightily to overcome this horrible situation he inherited. the second reason is most americans believe republicans only care about rich people. and those are branding problems that the republican party has to to overcome. and it's hard to overcome it because you've got three obstacles; academia, hollywood and our major media, all of which are overwhelmingly liberal. when you say something, it's got to be interpreted through the filter of those three entities, and often it's been distorted. >> host: larry elder is our guest, this is booktv on c-span2 live from the los angeles times festival of books, campus of usc. mike's in fort worth, texas. hi, mike. >> caller: how's it going, larry? my -- pretty good. i'm a african-american democrat, but i agree with you one of the big problems in the african-american community is lack of fathers in the house. but i think, larry, when you say that, you kind of come off kind of harsh on black people. now, what's the reason behind the lack of a lot of fathers being in th
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2013 4:45pm EDT
into the tony blare's comments with george bush on the microphone? oh, assad is like honey? what were they talking about? they seemed to like him. >> i don't recall that one. i recall the explaytive. referring to the g8 meeting in 2006 when -- during the israel hezbollah war, and bush leaned over to blare and whatever he called him, he said, you know, if we request get syria to stop this, put a four letter explaytive there, that will calm the situation, and what was interesting about, you know, that comment, and bush did not like that after 2003, 2004 particularly, and i asked bashar about that comment, and i said, what do you think of that comment by bush caught on tape? again, half expecting him to say, oh, you know, typical this, typical all that sort of stuff, he said, i love it. i love it because that means they are thinking about me. they are worried about me. that is part of syria foreign policy is having some sort of leverage. it's a weak country military militarily. the leverage is through the support of hezbollah, iran, support of hamas and palestinian territories. that's th
CSPAN
Aug 5, 2013 11:00pm EDT
calculation and work to win public opinion over. baker understood it. george bush unfortunately never did. what happened was when israel attacked gaza when israel attacked lebanon and the u.s. committed outrages in iran we lost public opinion and we have this guy in tehran becoming the new hero of the arab masses saying to them your governments are doing nothing. i am the one standing up against the west on 2006 the numbers were way up. iran's numbers rose as arab alienation and frustration with the west grew. as the ability or the willingness of their own leaders to challenge the west became obvious they went down and ahmadinejad went up and to chart all assad window. it became the resistance that was fighting for arab honor and a period one one air of honor was viewed after abu ghraib. it's tough. we don't want to remember abu ghraib. the arabs don't. we don't want to think about what the iraq war meant all those years or the continued situation of palestinians over lebanon's beleaguered after all these years and continually under threat. it was occupied for 20 years. we don't want to t
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2013 2:00pm EDT
of texas does recently because of the leadership though shown by george w. bush, is that when you look at states like arizona, not typical in arizona, but i was just thinking alabama, arkansas' next. if you look at arizona, if memory serves arizona export something like $50 billion a year. if you look at texas can we export $206 billion a year. 35% of those exports go directly to mexico. i think george w. bush understood the tenuous but important relationship that has to exist with our neighbors to the south. i think he was very strategic and smart in building and growing and fostering a relationship over time. and today, texas is benefiting from his leadership back then. a large proportion of the hispanic owned firms in this state and minority owned firms in the state are actually owned by mexican nationals. and so this didn't happen by accident. it happened because very strategic visionary leadership happened two, three decades or a decade ago. now we are benefiting from the. >> creating an environment. >> absolutely. doesn't happen overnight. now you see other states beginning to re
CSPAN
Aug 14, 2013 10:00am EDT
on their taxes. >> up next, george w. bush institute resale the series of discussions looking at immigrants contributions for america. this panel focuses on the economic effects of naturalization. from dallas, this is about one hour. >> a pleasure to be here. i worked for closed with president bush when he was in the white house trying to advance immigration reform in the last battle and so it's a pleasure for me to be back in his beautiful new house, talking about immigration. so thank you to this institute. i want to harken back as we get started to the ceremony that we saw this morning combat incredible moving ceremony because what we're going to talk about here today is not just out immigration is good for america, but have naturalization and citizenship actually even ups the ante and makes immigrants even more beneficial for the united states. to benefit themselves, but it's also a benefit for the country. so the very people we saw this morning when they came in the door, they were great for america but as they went out the door their even more. they will be even more of an asset. we w
CSPAN
Aug 4, 2013 10:00pm EDT
have claimed and therefore george bush could say don't pay into it, simply give each person the fund and they can invest on their pension. if you monetize your deferred compensation, that is a terrible idea. it further damages the devotee of people to have social and there is a link to having a social wage is that it dramatically is important for the society because then people start to see of objectively the interest is united. one of the great tracks to american history is rather than to countercyclical spending through the social expenditure, it is always been done through the military spending. you spend militarily through bringing the economy back to life. that was the whole post world war golden age etc we've so in that sense one has to confront this idea because it is easy to do the spending on the military because it is already a hari article society in the military and encampment that the more you begin to feel objectively or ties with other people are there you might be able to create a political movement where people subjectively then relate to the common agenda and i thin
CSPAN
Aug 14, 2013 11:00pm EDT
baker had with george bush because -- i don't know exactly the reason, but i said, for example, the other day, the national security adviser went to moscow to meet with the russian president has started arranging a relationship. if i was secretary of state would not have tolerated that. that is my job. and as national security adviser , you're a staff person, not a principle. i remember when general powell got the role. he understood. he came around to me and said, i am a member of your staff. obviously the president is my main guy, but my job is to staff the council. and so i think that is beginning to get out of kilter. in my book have quite a lot to say about the structural governance and how it is going, i think, in the wrong direction. >> host: secretary george shultz, a couple more issues on your mind. number one, demographics. you're worried about demographics. >> guest: i'm not worried. an observant. i see that the demographics of the world had changed and are continuing to change rapidly. the developed countries basically have no fertility. they are getting to be older
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2013 12:00pm EDT
for. george w. bush had done that i think he would've been, we would've been heard cries of impeachment. we had part of our immigration laws suspended by the president. there's just a variety of issues like that where he has gone outside. we have tension with our system, struggles between congress and the president. this one is very -- i think you'll see it continue. but there will be legal cases. >> i'm going to try to bounce around a little bit but again we will get to everybody. >> i was a little concerned to find that you were not in support of making the continuing resolution contingent upon removing what optional spending you move on obamacare. i feel very strongly. i speak from a point of view -- [applause] >> i think they do, too. >> this is not theoretical for me because two weeks ago today my husband and i paid in cash for our son to have major surgery. but, you know, what? that's the price i paid for the liberty of my children. i'm self-employed. i understand the consequent of that as i've limited options thanks our government on insurance. i understand that i
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2013 12:30am EDT
, and compare it with what current history contrast to the way george debut bush took them but different conflicts of different styles but if they took him to work quite quickly she could nurture more into in some ways he would beat them around the headed cannot persuade many other countries that it was worth fighting so roosevelt is the opposite this book tells the story of this incredible effort although subtle over the course of two years to build the of bipartisan domestic consensus in adults and early intervention and prepared to use other countries to feed from behind -- leave them behind and was prepared to take his time. in fact, the result was criticized almost as much to felt he was going too fast period he did it it. >> is a very clear direction but he wanted to do is no way that that the country did not into the ward / e merge united and ready for the fight. >> again and 11 came at the beginning. >> and pearl harbor helped. it totally destroyed isolationism in the united states at that time. but by then roosevelt had marginalized the bodies through the danish with the decisio
CSPAN
Aug 4, 2013 4:30pm EDT
and compare it for us in modern history, current history for example contrasted with the way george w. bush took this nation to the war. >> if president bush took america to war quite quickly and didn't nurture a bipartisan consensus in some ways he used it around for the hid. ki wasn't able to persuade other countries, many other countries with the exception of britain and a few others that it was worth fighting and so america more or less went in to hit by himself. the book tells the story of an incredible effort over the course of two years to build a domestic consensus in favor of internationalism and ultimately intervention and he was prepared to use other countries as proxy's by allowing the brits and the french. he was prepared to take this kind and roosevelt was criticized almost as much he felt he was going too fast. he felt he was going too slowly. he did it carefully and slowly. that is the reaction to the events and get. when you step back and look at the whole run there is a direction as kurt says he knew where he wanted to end up but he wanted to do it in a way that took the c
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2013 12:00pm EDT
, therefore, george bush could say, well, don't pay into it. simply give each potential -- each person a fund. you monetize your deferred compensation. it's a terrible idea. it further damages the ability of people to have a social thing. and by the way, the link to having a social wage is that it's dramatic create important for society. -- dramatically important for society. because then people start to see objectively their interests are united. you know, one of the great tricks of american history is rather than do countercyclical spending through social expenditure, countercyclical spending in america has always been done through military spending. you spend militarily to bring the economy back to life. that was the whole post-war golden age, etc. so in that sense one has to confront this idea, you know, because it was easy to do countercyclical spending with the military because it's already a hierarchical society, you know, in military encampments. but society is not hierarchical, and the more you begin to feel objectively that your ties with other people are there, you might be able to
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2013 8:30pm EDT
and much more popular than george bush but that glory is fleeting because they are in an untenable situation where their success is an immediate unfavorable referendum that everybody before them, do they have certain personality qualities and ambitions and visions that make them suspect by their peers. sort of like this 19th century western figure that we see in 20th century films where it's high noon, ethan edwards, the magnificent seven, the man is shot liberty balance. we bring these people in and they are suspect figures and we all want shane to do something to get rid of the -- but it's better he walks out the door. it's better that high noon will kaine takes the bag and throws it down and says i've had enough. whether we like it or not it didn't end very well. themistocles committed suicide in persia. belisarius ended up as a beggar on the streets of constantinople humiliated at his emperor. sherman was called crazy and called a terrorist. he spent most of his post-war career trying to defend what it in a very effective way but he wasn't popular like grant or matthew ridgway.
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2013 8:00am EDT
hardly ever come up. they were attacking dick cheney, attacking george bush with, attacking the fbi and others, nsa had pretty much been unscathed in all this. the only time it really came up as a matter of debate in the intelligence committee was people from the nsa coming forward and saying what a rough time they were having with the fisa court, how hard it was for them to get court orders, how hard it was to be able to follow up on the information they were getting. this is not a rubber stamp. this is constantly scrutinized. it's also scrutinized by the house and senate intelligence committees. i worry saying congress is keeping an eye on it for you isn't exactly a vote of confidence. but, seriously, people on the intelligence committee take it very seriously. i can tell you that this stuff is looked at very, very carefully. so i think we have to keep all of this in mind. i don't see any significant violation of civil liberties. i don't see any significant -- to me, if we have a balanced thought like with zazi in 2009, zazi, and this is one of those forest gump moments where you
CSPAN
Aug 13, 2013 2:00pm EDT
that both in terms of his experience here at the george george bush institute but more partly in terms of his experience as an army officer. >> thank you robert payday would like to start out by wishing congratulations to our newest citizens. my experience over the past 24 years as active military service has been in our our most engage service-oriented and patriotic citizens and servicemembers are our newest. and so as the director of the military service initiatives here i had the honor and responsibility to lead the bush institute's effort to honor the service and sacrifice of all of their post-9/11 veterans military servicemembers and their families but also to empower and unite the efforts of non-profits businesses universities individual citizens and communities to improve the well-being of those veteran servicemembers and their families but also to release their potential to continue to serve as national assets in their communities after their military service is over. and so since september 11, 2001, 2.3 million members of this country have gone -- worn the uniform in iraq or a
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2013 9:00am EDT
george bush when he talked about this program when it was first revealed by "the new york times." he said, well, when al qaeda and call somebody in the united states, i want to know who they're calling. that's kind of the underlying philosophy of this program, and i think it's the purpose. we're talking, it tends to spill over into people thinking, well, maybe we are monitoring their actual content of the conversation and we're not. it's medicaid, records, effectively the outside of the envelope that is put in your mailbox. it's that information that is on the envelope. and the date stamp and the postmark. >> would you have people believe that metadata have no significant privacies? i would rather if i had a choice, i hope not have either of these choices, of having every phone conversation i have for 30 days listening to them which, of course, is impractical to have a large number of people doing that, or all my metadata collected for 30 days? i would much rather -- >> collected by proctor and gamble oracle victoria beckham corporation, then i would be worried. and i think sometimes we d
CSPAN
Aug 13, 2013 11:00pm EDT
to talk about the cause of this and we took a little bit of heat from the george w. bush campaign is for not being prepared to wage traditional conflict due to the task force is. this would be the most likely vehicle also in the professional military education sphere. the peacekeeping stabilization operation institute and the u.s. army war college in the national defense immigration will continue to be part of this is expertise onto which we can draw. but i do expect good compared to matters. one case study talks about how it took more care can work anywhere. >> we have about six people so far and maybe a few others to try to fit you all in. >> hello, my name is piers martin and i'm here at the georgetown university. my question is related to one of the main ideas which is to broaden our positions and a conflict that was one of the first reactions from the united states is reaction and the european union started. working and building of institutions for common security and defense policy. as there seems to be quite a change of discussion right now because the discussions we are ha
CSPAN
Aug 30, 2013 12:00pm EDT
there were uncontrolled bureaucracies under george bush. it goes back to the thing we kind of started out with. the federal government is out of control. but it has been predicted by all of the historians that the republic would fail. the question is, how do we teach history, go back, every embrace the thing that made america great? and as i said earlier, i think we have to get in charge. i have been working for nine years to try to make a big difference. i have made a small difference. i worked every day trying to do things. i am convinced the only way we do that is half the state start exerting their temporary authority and reassessing -- [applause] -- changes to the constitution that restore federalism in the constitution. and so i think that is the way. you are frustrated. you want to see me in washington. asked my staff. as my wife. i want to pull my hair out. you know, i see two things. i see the constitution, and see what is happening to it. then i see grown men and women who know what the constitution says you don't care. that is what really makes me want to pull my hair out. they
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2013 6:00am EDT
't the same kind of relationships that i had with president nixon that, say, jim baker had with george bush. because i don't know exactly the reason. but i saw, for example, the other day that the national security adviser went to moscow to meet with putin and started ranging that relationship. if i was secretary of state, i would not tolerate that. that's my job. and the national security adviser's a staff person, not a principal. i remember when colin powell got the job of secretary of national security adviser, he understood. and he came around to me, and he said i'm a member of your staff. obviously, the president's my main guide, but with my job is to staff the could be is ill. the council. and so i think that's beginning to get out of kilter, and in my book i have quite a lot to say about the structure of governance and how it's going, i think, in the wrong direction. >> host: secretary schultz, a couple more issues on your mind. number one, demographics. you're worried about demographics. >> guest: oh, i'm not worried about it, i'm observant of it. i see that the demographics of the
CSPAN
Aug 5, 2013 5:00pm EDT
and human services from 2001 to 2005. he was appointed by president george w. bush. most recently for the record the governor joined the bipartisan policy center here as a senior adviser and we welcome him very much to the organization. governor, the budget when you took over in 2001 was about $380 billion is my record here. along with social security the was the largest and is the largest still today of the domestic agency. when you left at the end of 2004 it had grown $200 billion to over 580 billion-dollar agency. during your tenure you were hit with a slew of emergencies, anthrax, post 911, concerns over bioterrorism, the flu and the need to stockpile the smallpox vaccine. you also cleared up the plans to expand health insurance coveragn so when i look at your budget i know we are supposed to talk about constrained budgets but one might conclude you had no budget constraints on your agency but omb and barry anderson gave you a budget tie line. how did you go about and did the congress and particularly place restraints under congressional a budget that you hadn't anticipated cl
CSPAN
Aug 7, 2013 11:00pm EDT
. it was never approved by congress. if george w. bush would have done that we would have had impeachment. we have part of our laws unilaterally suspended by the president by the year before he said he couldn't do that. there is just a variety of issues like that where he has gone outside. we have tension within our system and struggles facing congress and the president but this one is very serious. i think you will see it continue that there will be legal cases. all the way back here. i'm going to try to bounce around a little bit but again we will get to everybody. we are going to wear willful excel. >> thank you. i was concerned to find out you were not in support of making the continuing resolution contention upon removing what optional spending you can remove on obamacare. i feel strongly and i think others do and i speak from a point -- [applause] this is not theoretical for me because two weeks ago today my husband and i paid in cash for her son to have major surgery a four-hour procedure but that is the price i pay for the liberty of my children. i am self-employed and understand the
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2013 10:00am EDT
's an attorney. he worked in several capacities when george w. bush was the founder of texas. the halon affiliation and they were delighted that stuart bowen has developed such innovative and attractive materials to understand. i think it really is held that there's a lot of visual presentation of lessons and iraq and the very complicated story of funding what didn't work very well. and how we can do betterh next te. we have invited stuart bowen to meet his presentations first. we will then turn to jim schear, who has recently finished his second tour of the pentagon as an assistant secretary for responsibility for stability operations in his earlier career he was a research scholar at the national defense university, director of research there and worked throughout his career on these questions of stabilization and reconstruction including at the u.n. and some of its early post of war success stories in cambodia, the balkans and elsewhere. so how did stuart bowen ideas, what kind of responses were there more broadly in the pentagon and the interagency community and his own reflections
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2013 2:00pm EDT
happened with george bush, of course. didn't call it recess. he called it looking to putin's eye and seeing his soul thinking he could understand the guy and do business. it didn't take him long to find out he didn't really have it right. there was no fallback, after that, i think it was the same situation. of just, you know, floundering about not knowing exactly how to deal with the russians. so yes, it really comes down to the person of valid my putin. it was always a sense of vladmir putin. things have definitely shifted since he announced he would come back and all of, by the way, the processes set in motion inside of russia. i'll thought about later. i think it's shaping very much how putin deals not only in domestic -- politics but foreign politicses. it's the lack of a notion how to deal with putin is kind of in the heart of a lot of these problem. >> that could be hard. he's a unique -- personality. i guess maybe we can sort of follow on that by pivoting off of cliff's point it's a little bit difficult to discern what the american strategy toward russia is. i have a lot of trouble d
CSPAN
Aug 7, 2013 9:00am EDT
criticizing the administration's -- we cut the budget and increased the overseas activities. george w. bush didn't run for president carried back to the 2008 campaign literature he didn't run promising a defense buildup and he wasn't intending to make foreign policy the center of his foreign policy than he wound up making as we know one of the most hardest decisions in history about the war of choice in iraq. so i don't think that cutting our military is going to be the best way to keep us out of trouble in the south china sea. i want steadiness and results and sustain the balance. that means we can make the economies and defense but not cuts like sequestration. >> mackenzie, you're concluding thoughts? >> i think that was very good. there isn't much to add except i wouldn't put all my eggs in one basket is basically the summary. all i want peace through strength or a modern day version of it, because i want a military that the tours. talking on the military front i want all those other things, too. i want strong allies, i want our partners capacity to be robust enough to defend themselves
CSPAN
Aug 30, 2013 8:00pm EDT
shoot our church? they appealed to president george h.w. bush at the time. they appealed to the u.n. someone to stop the slaughter. they will march to this treats free tracing the steps of the funeral two weeks before. some putting their hands up in the thee sign shouting viva sebastian. thousands from work school and home and they march to the santa cruz cemetery. when we got there we were interviewing people. why are you risking your life to do this and they would say for my mother, for my father, for my village that was wiped out and from the direction the procession had come we saw hundreds of indignation soldiers carrying their u.s. m-16s in the ready position marching up to the crowd. 90% of the weapons used were from the united states. the indonesian army was arms trained and financed by the united states and on this day was no different. the soldiers marched 10 to 12 abreast. allen and i were interviewing people in the middle of the crowd and allen suggested we walk to the front of the crowd. we knew the indonesian military had committed many massacres they had never done
CSPAN
Aug 26, 2013 8:30pm EDT
bush, george h. w. and also bill clinton. these are people who have a acknowledged drug use but go on to do great things. you point out that there were not caught up in the network of police arrest that can often times to real success in america >> guest: that's right. >> host: know when you look at the use of illegal drugs, your point not for legalization personally, but for education. and you talk about the idea that people should know what is in a cycle active drug one of your arguments that i found fascinating is most people who use illegal drugs are not taxed by your definition, does not interfere with parenting, work, all relationships. i think most americans if they heard this there was a, but doctor, you are taking away all of the hype and fear that we want our children to here. might be better to say to children, don't do drugs. even if your argument is true, there are people into illegal drugs and don't suffer consequences. why isn't it better given what you said about the police and now works of crime that then attach, why when you say you know it's better to say don't d
CSPAN
Aug 13, 2013 10:00am EDT
george w. bush and principal deputy press secretary. and john verrico, president-elect of the national association of government communicators. so starting with carolyn, let's hear what you have to say, give us your overview of the subject. >> i'm going to tell you about a couple surveys i've conducted this year, and the previous year. that are relevant to the topic we're discussing tonight. first, i surveyed reporters who cover federal agencies here in washington. i've got 146 respondents within margin of error of about 7%. then i surveyed current and former members of the national association of government communicate is, at 154 responses from a margin of error of about 4.3%. i'm going to throw some numbers at you but i want to quantify the situation. my questions focus on the indie thing process. for someone to talk about preapproval and routing. 98% of public affairs officers believe that they have a better idea than reporters about who in the agencies would be the best person to give an interview on a given topic. three quarters of journalists report they have to give approval fro
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2013 12:00pm EDT
on the others i think it's a war. medal was approved by congress, not a dime ever voted for it. had george w. bush had done that i think we would have heard cries of impeachment. we are part of our immigration laws, and i was suspended by the president when the year before he said he couldn't do that. there's just a variety of issues like that when he's gone outside. we have to tension with our system, struggles between congress and the president, but this one is very cities. you will see it continue. but there will be legal cases. all the way back. i'm going to try to bounce around all of it. it begin, we will get to everybody. >> i was a little concerned to find that you are not in support of making the continuing resolution contingent upon removing what optional spending you can remove on obamacare. i feel very strongly. i think the other speaker i speak from my point of view -- applaud not this is not theoretical because two weeks ago today my husband and i paid in cash for our son to have major surgery. a four-hour procedure. that's the price i pay for the liberty of my children. i'm se
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2013 10:00am EDT
for and what you were responsible for. >> guest: i served under but george w. bush administration and was appointed by the transportation secretary norman. and as you may know, he is a democrat who served in the republican administration and he was responsible for offering and then congress passed a reorganization act that led to the creation of this agency. and this agency fmsa receives a million daily shipments of hazardous air, land, truck, and sea, dessel and pipeline. >> host: you're current work with the national transportation advisers, what is that? >> guest: i am a lawyer by training and we also have a consulting practice. so, we talk infrastructure projects, transportation projects to both public and private sector clients. >> host: is one of your clients keystone xl? is anybody supporting trans canada? >> guest: no, sir. >> host: as far as keystone xl is concerned, the decision that you were taking, where do you stand if it shouldn't be built on the extension we've been talking about? >> guest: i've been monitoring this for several years. when i was at the d.o.t. the or
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2013 2:00pm EDT
, and that is former president george h.w. bush. i've had, i had a chance to work with him, incredible leader, an incredible human being who has given so much back to the community. as president of the united states, but as former president of the united states. so i am honored to stand in for him today. he apologizes, but -- [laughter] we've been talking a lot about work force and whether we have the right people in lace to provide the services -- in place to provide the services. you're the front line. you're the absolute front line. and for people to be able to get quality, affordable health care, they have to be able to come through that door and be accepted and have confidence that they're going to be treated with the care that they expect. and you have provided that. and you have done that as a volunteer. which is just remarkable from the point of view of if we could clone you and have you throughout -- [laughter] it would make life a lot easier. we've talked a lot also about how do you get people into the system, and you personally have gotten people into the system because of the mann
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2013 11:00pm EDT
to speak at the bush institute i leapt at the opportunities a way of such an admirer of george w. bush. you stole my fender a little bit talking about 4% growth but i don't think we can accomplish i think it is a precondition but the only way that i have a problem with that is that we could do that of the fourth year of the non recovery there is no reason it cannot be growing much faster than it is even a five or six or 7 percent growth this is interesting if you look at the period of a quarter-century unprecedented growth that was a period when we have the average of almost 4 percent growth over the same time period unprecedented immigration well over 12 lead americans and people say that it would depress rage wages but the actual evidence shows the opposite the biggest boom was also the biggest immigration that doesn't mean they caused it but it is substantial evidence. the second point is with respect to states, at the "wall street journal" the least 10 it editorials comparing california and texas, it is good. >> those moving from california to texas. so what you have seen over the last
CSPAN
Aug 6, 2013 2:00am EDT
of the george to be bush said ministration but as we described in our book fees stemming from a much deeper source that cut through both democratic and republican did frustration than something we describe as the united states each essentially giving in to the post cold war temptation to act as an imperial power in the middle east and this turned in policy with little regard for the reality on the ground in the middle east's proven deeply damaging to american interests, as a candidate in 2008 now president obama then seems to understand and he talked about courageously during the campaign and pledged not just to draw american troops from iraq but also the american mindset that had gotten into the strategic mistake to invade iraq in the first place and pledged to change the middle east policy but instead the obama administration has pursued policies as the predecessors the same policies that did such damage to our strategic position and as a result the obama administration today is not just providing a stalled middle east peace process but the demise of the true state solution to the palesti
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2013 11:00pm EDT
in the united states and certainly more than mayor sanchez and much more popular than george bush. but they are in these and untenable situation with the success is the unfavorable referendum because yet they have certain personality qualities and visions that make them suspect by their peers like the 19th century western that we see whether high noon, ethan edwards magnificence 73 bring the people in and they are suspect figures. we want them to get rid of the cattlemen but it is better than everyone or that they take the badge so whether real like it or not it did not and very well with themistocles ends with suicide 20 years later and tell sorus ended up the popular tradition ended up as dave we were trying to defend what he did but was not popular. for rescue ridgway was not made chairman of the joint chiefs and eisenhower he said. >> host: did not take thistles. was not ridgway but van fleet w. was not in the theater but he got involved with material controversy so finished the manuscript the petite blonde as she did have problems but these are controversial a and after the s
CSPAN
Aug 30, 2013 11:00pm EDT
like, why the indonesian military shoot our church? they appeal to president george h.w. bush, and appealed to the eun, and marched through the streets, retracing the steps of the funeral two weeks before. some putting their hands up in the v sign-chanting, viva east timor, viva independence, incredibly brave. and i that marched from schools and home and march to the santa cruz cemetery. when we got there we were interviewing people. why are you risking your life to do this? and they would say, for my mother. for my father. for my village. it was wiped out. and then from the direction the procession has come we saw hundreds of indonesian soldiers carrying their u.s. m-16s at the ready position marching up on the crowd. 90% of the weapons used were from the united states. the army was armed, trained and financed be the united states. and in this day it was no different. the soldiers marched up ten to 12 abreast. alan and i were interviewing people in the middle of the crowd. and allen suggest we walk to the front of the crowd, because we knew that the indonesian military commit
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